The Queen's Nursing Institute

The Queen's Nursing Institute works with the public, nurses and decision-makers to make sure that good quality nursing is available at home for everyone when they need it.

Healthcare at home
 
 
 

In this section:


NGS logo

This year, why not enjoy a day out at a National Gardens Scheme garden - you'll be helping fund the QNI too! 

Visit the Burdett Trust website

Providing vital funding for projects that help improve patient care.

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Visit our nursing heritage website, a celebration of District Nursing around the world since 1859.

Messages of Support for our Campaign

We are delighted that Julie Walters CBE, the award-winning actress and former nurse has lent her support to the campaign:

Julie Walters

 'I do think it's comforting to know that a trained and qualified nurse will visit us when we're ill at home. It's very worrying that these trained nurses are getting thin on the ground, and that they are being replaced by less experienced nurses or health care assistants. That's why I support the QNI's campaign: we are all potential patients, and we all deserve the best possible nursing care in our own homes, from the 'right nurse with the right skills.'

Julie Walters CBE


The MS Society:

"The MS Society is pleased to support this campaign. Many people with MS rely on community nurse specialists to provide them with much needed care in their own homes; the nurses play a vital role in advising on self care and co-ordinating input from other professionals, too. These tasks are highly specialised and require that nurses are trained and supported in their complex roles. People with MS need the right nurse with the right skills to deliver high quality care."

Lynne Brown, UK Programme Lead for Nursing, the MS Society.

The Stroke Association:

"Over 300,000 people in England alone live with moderate to severe disability as a result of a stroke and with an ageing population this figure looks set to rise year on year. Skilled home nursing is vital to enable people to live in their own homes and remain active and independent and The Stroke Association is pleased to support QNI in its campaign.” 

Nikki Hill, The Stroke Association.

Rosemary Cook CBE, The Queen's Nursing Institute

“Working in patients’ homes is a privilege, and the patients there are some of the most vulnerable in society. We are concerned that their care may suffer if the nurses or health care assistants who visit them are too inexperienced or unprepared. The real danger is that this decline in care will be invisible as it happens behind closed doors. Now is the time to act to ensure that we address the challenges facing community nursing services. We believe that well-trained community nursing teams are the key to providing high quality patient care, and reducing the dependency on GPs, A&E departments, and hospital beds.”

Rosemary Cook CBE, The Queen's Nursing Institute.

A community nurse:

"Do we need expert nursing? Yes. It has improved the lives and well being not just of my father but of my siblings and our families... the terror of watching the inept do their worst resulted in the need to police them so that harm to Dad was kept to a minimum and so that he could receive barely good enough care."

A community nurse quoted in '2020 Vision' (QNI 2009).

Education for Health:

"Evidence based care can only be provided by a health and social care team who have undertaken specific training and education which has been evaluated or otherwise quality assured to lead to improved outcomes in healthcare and patients' quality of life - in the 'closed door setting' of many care homes this is more critical than ever if our ageing and elderly population are to enjoy the best health available to their own unique context and life story. Education for Health is delighted to support this campaign and will be actively looking for opportunities to raise awareness for it."

Monica Fletcher, Chief Executive, Education for Health

Diabetes UK:

"With diabetes affecting the lives of 1 in 10 75 year olds, and 1 in 5 people over 85, Diabetes UK believes it is essential for these patients to have access to the highest quality care, in whichever setting they receive it. For those who need nursing at home, that care must be delivered by those who have sufficient skills to deliver it safely and effectively."

Simon O'Neill, Director of Care, Information and Advocacy, Diabetes UK

Macmillan Cancer Support:

"Macmillan Cancer Support is delighted to be able to take the opportunity to support the QNI Campaign 'Right Nurse, Right Skills' and to stress the importance of access to high quality community nursing care. Increasingly, people living with cancer need to be supported at home and in the community rather than in hospitals, and generalist nurses with specialist support are crucial to this. We believe that people who are nearing the end of their life should have the right to live their final days at home if they wish to do so and that access to quality community nursing outside traditional working hours is essential to their support. The experience and outcomes of people affected by cancer will be greatly improved by having access to the right community nursing staff with the right skills at the right time to meet their individual needs."

Jacqui Graves, Clinical Programme Manager, Macmillan Cancer Support

The British Heart Foundation:

"The British Heart Foundation currently supports over 450 specialist nurses in cardiac care, and we're delighted to support the campaign 'Right Nurse, Right Skills'. We recognise that nurses need specialist knowledge, skills and expertise to care for heart patients in the community. Hundreds of thousands of heart patients and their carers have benefited from, and come to trust, our specialist nurses. However, this trust and the quality of care may be diminished if community nurses lack such a high calibre of specialist training and proficiencies."

Catherine Kelly, Programme Lead, Healthcare Professionals and Service Innovation at the British Heart Foundation.

NHS Alliance:

"District nurses are the centurions of care in every community and have been since time immemorial. With an ageing and more vulnerable population, it is essential that every community has the right cadre of fully trained nurses so that patients can get the best care and stay in their homes as long as is reasonable or appropriate. In times of financial restraint, it is doubly important that their skills are fully recognised and their work and training is fully funded."

Dr Michael Dixon, Chair of NHS Alliance

 

 

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