The Queen's Nursing Institute

The Queen's Nursing Institute works with the public, nurses and decision-makers to make sure that good quality nursing is available at home for everyone when they need it.

Healthcare at home
 
 
 

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QNI responds to Francis Report

 

‘The findings of the Francis Report reflect the principal and long-held concerns of The Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI).  
 
‘The report calls, above all, for patient-centred care, and the need always to put the needs of patient first, and all of Robert Francis’ recommendations have this as their ultimate goal. But in order for any of these recommendations to have effect, there must be a proper staffing level of qualified and skilled nurses.
 
‘The QNI’s Right Nurse, Right Skills campaign has, since 2011, highlighted the loss of skills within community nursing teams and the problems that this brings. It is time that the NHS acknowledged that a shortage of qualified nursing staff (in hospital or community) leads to poorer health outcomes for patients, especially for those who are most vulnerable and dependent.
 
‘Francis also says that nursing needs a stronger voice within NHS institutions and this is something that we have consistently argued for. The QNI works hard to make sure that confident and knowledgeable nurses are in senior management and leadership positions in the NHS, empowered and responsible for quality care at every level. 
 
‘The report also calls for the regulation of healthcare assistants, something which the QNI has consistently advocated in recent years. Regulation of HCAs is at least as important in the community – where care is often delivered behind closed doors - as it is in hospitals. Our report ‘Nursing People at Home’ (2011) highlighted the issue that many patients were unable to tell who was a registered nurse, and who was a HCA. This must be addressed. 
 
‘If the NHS is to keep the public’s trust it has to invest in a properly skilled and well-led nursing workforce, supported by regulated healthcare assistants, trained to deliver the care that we want for our loved ones and ourselves.’
 
- Crystal Oldman, Chief Executive, The Queen’s Nursing Institute 
 
ENDS
 
Notes to Editors
 
1. The Queen’s Nursing Institute is the charity dedicated to nursing care in people’s homes and communities. We do this through our national network of Queen’s Nurses, who act as professional role models and leaders; we influence healthcare policy in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and we fund practical projects, led by nurses, which improve care for patients in the community. 
 
2. The Right Nurse, Right Skills campaign was launched in 2011. Our report ‘Nursing People at Home: the issues, the stories, the actions’ (2011) summarises the QNI’s concerns based on interviews and other data gathered from nurses and patients in the community. The report can be viewed here: http://www.qni.org.uk/campaigns/nursing_people_at_home_report 
 
 
 

 

‘The findings of the Francis Report reflect the principal and long-held concerns of The Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI).  

‘The report calls, above all, for patient-centred care, and the need always to put patients first; all of Robert Francis’ recommendations have this as their ultimate goal. But in order for any of these recommendations to have effect, there must be a proper staffing level of qualified and skilled nurses.

‘The QNI’s Right Nurse, Right Skills campaign has, since 2011, highlighted the loss of skills within community nursing teams and the problems that this brings. It is time that the NHS acknowledged that a shortage of qualified nursing staff (in hospital or community) leads to poorer health outcomes for patients, especially for those who are most vulnerable and dependent.

‘Francis also says that nursing needs a stronger voice within NHS institutions and this is something that we have consistently argued for. The QNI works hard to make sure that confident and knowledgeable nurses are in senior management and leadership positions in the NHS, empowered and responsible for quality care at every level. 

‘The report also calls for the regulation of healthcare assistants, something which the QNI has consistently advocated in recent years. Regulation of HCAs is at least as important in the community – where care is often delivered behind closed doors - as it is in hospitals. Our report ‘Nursing People at Home’ (2011) highlighted the issue that many patients were unable to tell who was a registered nurse, and who was a HCA. This must be addressed. 

‘If the NHS is to keep the public’s trust it has to invest in a properly skilled and well-led nursing workforce, supported by regulated healthcare assistants, trained to deliver the care that we want for our loved ones and ourselves.’

- Crystal Oldman, Chief Executive, The Queen’s Nursing Institute 

ENDS

Notes to Editors

1. The Queen’s Nursing Institute is the charity dedicated to nursing care in people’s homes and communities. We do this through our national network of Queen’s Nurses, who act as professional role models and leaders; we influence healthcare policy in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and we fund practical projects, led by nurses, which improve care for patients in the community. 

2. The Right Nurse, Right Skills campaign was launched in 2011. Our report ‘Nursing People at Home: the issues, the stories, the actions’ (2011) summarises the QNI’s concerns based on interviews and other data gathered from nurses and patients in the community. The report can be viewed here: http://www.qni.org.uk/campaigns/nursing_people_at_home_report 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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