The Queen's Nursing Institute

The Queen's Nursing Institute works with the public, nurses and decision-makers to make sure that good quality nursing is available at home for everyone when they need it.

Healthcare at home
 
 
 

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English and Philippine nurses share knowledge and culture

 

·         A comparison of the way in which Community Health Needs Assessments are undertaken in the UK and in the Philippines, in order to identify the nursing skills and education required to meet those needs. In the UK there is access to the services of community nurses through the NHS but there is no such structure in the Philippines. Community nursing is delivered on a community wide, public health based system while access to home nursing is patchy and based on the ability to pay for private nursing care.
 
·         Cultural aspects of care and a comparison between the approach to nursing in The Philippines and the UK. Philippine nursing students learn about community health on a whole population basis, not by visiting homes to deliver care. To what extent is there is a difference in the training of nurses in relation to community nursing experiences and how does this difference impact on the skills they demonstrate as qualified nurses? To what extent do cultural differences explain the consistency in the care and compassion of Filipino nurses, which is so legendary in the UK?
 
The meeting will lead to an application for research funding to explore community nursing culture, practice and education in both countries, with the aim of learning from each other to improve patient care in each of our countries.
 
Crystal Oldman noted, ‘This is an exciting opportunity for shared learning across cultures, practice and education systems. The conditions which led to the foundation of the QNI 125 years ago are being replicated now in The Philippines. Those who cannot afford nursing in the home either do not receive the care they need, or have to be admitted to hospital.’
 
Professor Tuazon also spent time with Queen’s Nurse Gina Hibell, an Advanced Community Nurse Practitioner, in Hastings, East Sussex and Madeleine Trotter, a District Nursing Sister and Team Leader in Stevenage, Hertfordshire.
 
Professor Tuazon commented, ‘Queen’s Nurses provide a blueprint for the high quality community nursing service required in the Philippines. I would like to explore the potential for a similar system of recognition of excellence in community nursing there.’
 
ENDS
 
Notes: The attached photograph shows, L to R: Dr Margaret Greenfields (Director of the Institute for Diversity Research, Inclusivity, Communities and Society (IDRICS); Crystal Oldman, QNI Chief Executive; Professor Josefina Tuazon (Dean of the University of the Philippines Manila College of Nursing); Agnes Fanning (Department Manager for Primary Care and Public Health at Bucks New University) and Ros Bryar (Professor of Community and Primary Care Nursing and Head of Public Health and Primary Care Unit at City University and Fellow of the QNI).
 

The QNI recently hosted a senior academic from The University of the Philippines Manila College of Nursing, Professor Josafina Tuazon. The event, on 11 February, was the culmination of a ten day visit to the UK. Professor Tuazon met with Crystal Oldman, chief executive of the QNI, and other leading nurse educators.

The meeting identified the following key areas for learning and collaboration between the Philippines and the UK:

  • A comparison of the way in which Community Health Needs Assessments are undertaken in the UK and in the Philippines, in order to identify the nursing skills and education required to meet those needs. In the UK there is access to the services of community nurses through the NHS but there is no such structure in the Philippines. Community nursing is delivered on a community wide, public health based system while access to home nursing is patchy and based on the ability to pay for private nursing care.
  • Cultural aspects of care and a comparison between the approach to nursing in The Philippines and the UK. Philippine nursing students learn about community health on a whole population basis, not by visiting homes to deliver care. To what extent is there is a difference in the training of nurses in relation to community nursing experiences and how does this difference impact on the skills they demonstrate as qualified nurses? To what extent do cultural differences explain the consistency in the care and compassion of Filipino nurses, which is so legendary in the UK?

The meeting will lead to an application for research funding to explore community nursing culture, practice and education in both countries, with the aim of learning from each other to improve patient care in each of our countries.

Crystal Oldman noted, ‘This is an exciting opportunity for shared learning across cultures, practice and education systems. The conditions which led to the foundation of the QNI 125 years ago are being replicated now in The Philippines. Those who cannot afford nursing in the home either do not receive the care they need, or have to be admitted to hospital.’

Professor Tuazon also spent time with Queen’s Nurse Gina Hibell, an Advanced Community Nurse Practitioner, in Hastings, East Sussex and Madeleine Trotter, a District Nursing Sister and Team Leader in Stevenage, Hertfordshire.

Professor Tuazon commented, ‘Queen’s Nurses provide a blueprint for the high quality community nursing service required in the Philippines. I would like to explore the potential for a similar system of recognition of excellence in community nursing there.’

Dr Josefina Tuazon at the QNI

Left to Right: Dr Margaret Greenfields (Director of the Institute for Diversity Research, Inclusivity, Communities and Society (IDRICS); Crystal Oldman, QNI Chief Executive; Professor Josefina Tuazon (Dean of the University of the Philippines Manila College of Nursing); Agnes Fanning (Department Manager for Primary Care and Public Health at Bucks New University) and Ros Bryar (Professor of Community and Primary Care Nursing and Head of Public Health and Primary Care Unit at City University and Fellow of the QNI).

 

 

 

 

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